Stephanie Sanchez

Performer

Find me online:

“I am an actor, a host, and a performer. Singing, dancing, acrobatics: I'll do it all.”

MY ROUTE:

The Curved Road

MY WORK LIFE:

Performer

foundation interest 1 interest 2

My work allows me to combine the foundation of COMMUNICATING / SHARING STORIES and the interests of ACTING & THEATRE and FILM.


DAY IN AND DAY OUT

I start my day on set and I'm in my element, preparing for my scenes. Then I get to play full-out in my craft, in my character, along with my fellow actors. On a great day, I get to collaborate with a group of talented individuals, directors and crew who are at the top of their craft, and who can teach me a lot about their experiences.

SKILLS, TRAINING, OR EXPERIENCE NEEDED

You should continue taking classes; like any craft, if you don't use it, you lose it. You have to stay connected to your instrument and keep exercising your acting muscle. You also have to stay healthy; you are your own instrument, so it's really important to take care of your body and mind. Address anything that's going on in your mind, and take care of your mental health so that you can show up to the job and be open and in control of your emotions.

EDUCATION TO GET HERE:

Performer

I RECOMMEND COMPLETING:

  • High School
  • Undergraduate - Psychology, General
  • Associate's Degree / Some College

What I studied STRONGLY RELATES to my work...

MY EDUCATION

  • High School -
  • Undergraduate - University of Notre Dame, Psychology, General
  • Associate's Degree / Some College - San Diego City College

SOME HELPFUL FIRST STEPS FOR SOMEONE IN COLLEGE

The most important thing you can do is get into an acting class. If you're getting a degree, you can study whatever floats your boat, but make sure you incorporate some theater or on-camera training to develop your technical skills. Junior college is a great resource to teach you a specific skill, like acting, rather than giving you a broad degree. But know that it's equally important to have a wide range of knowledge and experiences that you'll be able to draw upon later on down the road.

HURDLES I OVERCAME

THE “NOISE” FROM MY PEERS

“You're new here; you don't know what you're talking about.”

HOW I OVERCAME THE “NOISE”

When I first joined the Navy, the man training me was a total jerk. The rest of my peers told me he was emasculated by my quick learning skills, so he'd been feeding me incorrect information to make me look bad. After I gave a wrong answer to a senior officer, I realized I couldn't trust this guy, and I took my training upon myself. I sat down with senior officers and learned every single thing I could. When I took my boards, I knew every answer without a doubt and blew them out of the water.

Service Background and Insight

What branch of the military did you serve in?

Navy

When did you complete active military service (ETS)? Please specify the year (YYYY).

2005

What is the highest rank you reached while in the service?

O-3

What are some tips you would recommend for someone transitioning into civilian life?

Go to your transition assistance program; it's a brief overview of what you'll need in the civilian world, but it offers very valuable resources, like career counseling and resume building classes. I also recommend taking some sort of aptitude test.

As many as 400,000 service members live with the invisible wounds of war. Have you experienced PTSD, combat stress, or TBI as a result of your service?

Combat Stress

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