Charles Lynn Lowder

Chief Operating Officer

2TOOTS Train Whistle Grill

Find me online:

“I run a family-friendly restaurant franchise that's currently on the grow.”

MY ROUTE:

The Curved Road

MY WORK LIFE:

Chief Operating Officer

foundation interest 1 interest 2

My work allows me to combine the foundation of UPHOLDING A CAUSE AND BELIEF and the interests of ENTREPRENEURSHIP and ARMED SERVICES.


DAY IN AND DAY OUT

On any given day, my main task is to meet the business goals that I've set for myself and for my restaurants for that day.

SKILLS, TRAINING, OR EXPERIENCE NEEDED

You need life experiences. Recognize that the most painful life lessons are often the best, and try to analyze the hard times to see what you can learn from them. We don't learn when the sun's on our face and the wind's at our back; we learn when we're down in the trenches, struggling to get out. When you're going through those hard times, listen to the people that you love, listen to your service buddies, see what kind of wisdom you can glean from them, and apply that to your own life.

EDUCATION TO GET HERE:

Chief Operating Officer

I RECOMMEND COMPLETING:

  • High School
  • Undergraduate - General Studies
  • Graduate - American/U.S. Law/Legal Studies/Jurisprudence

What I studied RELATES to my work...

MY EDUCATION

  • High School -
  • Undergraduate - University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, General Studies
  • Graduate - DePaul University, American/U.S. Law/Legal Studies/Jurisprudence

SOME HELPFUL FIRST STEPS FOR SOMEONE IN COLLEGE

The first thing you need to do is learn self-discipline and self-control. If you haven't had that drilled into you at home, you need to learn it somewhere, whether that be in school, in sports, or in the military. The sooner you start building your character, the better your decisions are going to be. Without self-discipline, you become rudderless; you're just floating around aimlessly.

HURDLES I OVERCAME

THE “NOISE” FROM MYSELF

“I'm not good enough. I don't know if I can do this.”

HOW I OVERCAME THE “NOISE”

We always save the most cruel, most unforgiving criticisms for ourselves—the things we say to ourselves, we would never, ever say to one of our friends. Instead, we have to practice positive self-talk. Tell yourself you're good enough and you're strong enough. Something else I've learned from working with youths and inner-city football teams is that it's incredibly important to have a role model, someone who can encourage you and balance out any of the doubts and fears you impose upon yourself.

Service Background and Insight

What branch of the military did you serve in?

Marine Corps

When did you complete active military service (ETS)? Please specify the year (YYYY).

1983

What is the highest rank you reached while in the service?

Major

What are some tips you would recommend for someone transitioning into civilian life?

Realize you’ve gone through something profound, and that there are going to be residual effects. Stay in touch with your buddies because they’ll understand better than anyone. Use your network, including the VA. Go get the help you need.

As many as 400,000 service members live with the invisible wounds of war. Have you experienced PTSD, combat stress, or TBI as a result of your service?

Combat Stress

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